Posted on Sep 15, 2010
In reading Zen stories, easily found on the Internet under Zen Stories, the technique of the master teacher is simplicity. There is no great complication. There is no inner “calling” to be a student by a Zen professional. Only one thing is present in any would-be student: self-discipline. With self-discipline comes self-dedication, self-determination and self-diligence. Each student is an ordinary human being. Each student feels there is something more in life than what he has so far seen or been taught. He feels an inner emptiness, a sense that he is not getting all out of life that life has to offer. As an artist first desires to express a sensitivity from within his being nd trains under master artists to open himself to the magic of the pictures within, then the glory comes forth. There are many types of artists and each expresses from his inner genius the miracle of his connectivity to the allness. This is not taught. This is there. What is taught and shared is the dedication to revealing, to listen to the artist within . What is taught and shared is building the determination to stand forth in the belief that the genius is present. What is trained, taught and shared is the diligence to stand forth under all possibilities to find the miracle to release the eternal wisdom within awaiting expression. A boy often approached a Zen master in his temple and asked to be allowed to enter his school, a place where the inner master unfolds in each participant. The boy was blind and emaciated. He had no education. He spoke a strange dialect and it was difficult to understand him. “Why have you come here?” the teacher asked. The lad replied, “I feel inside of me I am free. I feel inside of me is a giant balloon filled with something special. I must set it free. Can you help me?” The teacher was undaunted by the boy’s apparent limitations and said, “Will you agree to do whatever I tell you to do and not judge it by what you have experienced? Will you close your ears to the comments of the others in the school and hear only from the divine in you?” So young, yet eagerly the candidate agreed to everything saying, “I left my family who had only pity on me. I left my village which had only sadness in what they saw in me. I left everything that I have known to dedicate myself to you to find myself.” After a pause he added, “I am ready Master Teacher!” The boy proved to be the master’s finest pupil. He gave fully of his diligence, determination and dedication to whatever was asked of him. His self-discipline was legend among the temple students. Other students observing the blind lad, forgot he was blind. His body developed powerfully in a very short time with beneficial foods and exercise. Associating with the scholarly beings of the school, he soon spoke perfectly, drawing from his inner wisdom. Other students took twenty years and more to arrive at a major step on their inner path. This blind boy saw without physical eyes more perfectly than his sighted fellows. He exercised and ate well and developed a profoundly sound body. But most of all, he found his inner center and swelt there* He developed an awareness of all of his senses which made him alert in all areas. At thirteen, the amazing lad went into the world an accomplished Zen master. He was known as the “Magic Master” listening to the divine in him under all circumstances and guiding others along their spiritual path, a consummate spiritual master.